Jozan Rug

Jozan Rug

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New Jozan rug

Jozan rugs are made in the surroundings of the village Jozan in the Iranian Malayer area. Jozan rugs are quality rugs of the Sarouk type often with designs as early 20th century Sarouks. Jozan rugs are often called Jozan Sarouk or Malayer Sarouk in trade. In recent production the finer qualities are labelled Jozan and the less finer knotted are labelled Malayer.

They are double-wefted on a cotton foundation.

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Heriz Rug

Heriz Rug

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Heriz rugs are Persian rugs from the area of Heris, East Azerbaijan in northwest Iran, northeast of Tabriz. Such rugs are produced in the village of the same name in the slopes of Mount Sabalan. Heriz carpets are durable and hard-wearing and they can last for generations. 19th century examples of such carpets are often found on sale by major auction houses in United States and Europe. Part of the reason for the toughness of Heriz carpets is that Mount Sabalan sits on a major deposit of copper. Traces of copper in the drinking water of sheep produces high quality wool that is far more resilient than wool from other areas.[1]

Heriz rug weavers often make them in geometric, bold patterns with a large medallion dominating the field. Such designs are traditional and often woven from memory.

Similar rugs from the neighbouring towns and villages of the Heriz region are Afshar, Heris, Mehraban, Sarab, Bakhshaish, and Gorevan.[citation needed] The grades of these rugs are primarily based on village name. Serapis, for example, have been considered the finest grade of Heriz since the beginning of the 20th century.[2]

Heriz rugs are of coarse construction. The rugs range from 30 kpsi on the low end to 100–110 kpsi on the high end. It is rare to see a rug over 100 kpsi that would look like an authentic Heriz unless it is an antique silk Heriz.

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Flokati Rug

Flokati Rug

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flokati rug is a handmade shag wool rug. Making flokatis is a long-time tradition of the Vlachs in the Pindus mountains. The natural color of a flokati rug is off-white, but they may be dyed different colors. The entire rug is wool, including the backing from which the tapered shag emerges. After the rug is woven, it is placed in the cold water of a river to fluff the shag. They continue to be handmade in the mountains of Greece and are regarded as desirable in American modern decor[when?] and children’s rooms[dubious ].

Flokati rugs were usually offered as prizes on the 1980s game show Press Your Luck (and often joked about when won).[1]

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Dhurrie

Dhurrie

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Dhurries of Rajasthan

dhurrie (also dhurri or durrie or durry) is a thick flat-woven rug or carpet[1] used traditionally in India as floor-coverings.

The concept of dhurrie is a little bit different from a rug or carpet, because they were use for bedding or packaging, not only as a floor covering[2]. But since the dhurries serve the same purpose as carpet or rugs they can be described as one.

Uses

They have a variety of use depending on size, pattern and material. The smallest one is 12″ by 12″ and is used as a table cover for telephone stands and flower vases. They are also made in sizes that are ideal for doing meditation 24” by 24”, known as an Aasan.

Dhurries used in large political or social gatherings may be as large as 20 feet by 20 feet. Dhurries are easily portable being light weight and foldable. They come in variety of color combinations and patterns catering to the needs of any taste or occasion.

Dhurrries have a low maintenance cost as they do not get infected by Silverfish or other insects responsible for destroying carpets.[why?]

Dhurries can be used year round. The cotton dhurrie is warm in winters and cool in summers.

Material

Dhurries are made from four types of materials:

  1. Cotton
  2. Wool
  3. Jute
  4. Silk

And in variety of combination of all these materials. This material is first converted into thread and then woven into dhurries.

Manufacturing

Dhurries are made manually by skilled artisans on a traditional horizontal loom or vertical loom.

In Rajasthan pit looms are also used for weaving in which weaver sits in a pit and feet are used in weaving. The maximum breadth is 24″.

Madhya Pradesh dhurries are known for their sturdy character and delightful colours. RajasthanUttar PradeshPunjab and Himachal Pradesh,make distinctive type of dhurries. In some part of these states the dhurries make a part of dowry given at the time of a daughter’s marriage.

Several important centres of durrie-making in pre-Independence Punjab are now in Pakistan; however, in present-day Punjab, the areas around Ludhiana, Faridkot and Bhatinda are fairly prolific and well-known.

Dhurries made in Rajasthan at Salawas are known as Panja dhurries and are exported on large scale. Khairabad in Uttar Pradesh is a major dhurrie making centre. Citapore Rugs (Sitapur dhurries) made here are based on flat weave technique using horizontal looms. Besides cotton, jute, rayon and chennile dhurries are also made here and exported all over the world. IKEA and Agocha have been sourcing dhurries for their stores from this area.

Dhurries are also made in Navalgund taluk of Karnataka state in India.It has its own geo graphical tag for durry, Navalgund Durries known as Jamkhana in local Kannada language.

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Braided Rug

Braided Rug

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A woman making a braided rug.

The braided rug was a staple in early, Colonial American culture. Settlers used scraps of clothing and other excess materials to make a floor covering that would provide warmth and protection for a home’s residents and guests.

Braided area rugs can be constructed in a variety of different ways including a banded braid construction, cloth braid construction, flat braid construction and yarn braid construction. Banded braid constructions have wide bands of either solid colored or variegated braids made from predetermined patterns to offer an appealing, thick look. A cloth braid construction is indicative of a time when outgrown clothing was cut into strips and then hand-braided into a floor covering. This particular construction is unique to one manufacturer, Thorndike Mills. A flat braid construction is a common construction as it is one of the easier and more classic methods. Three ropes of fabric or yarn are intertwined. A yarn braid construction evolves from yarn in its initial state to a uniquely finished area rug.

Braiding is an extremely old yet versatile technique that has been modernized over recent decades to display its appeal and charm.

Modern braided rug manufacturing

Unlike the early American settlers very few people today have the time to make their own rugs. Commercially made braided rugs that one is likely to find in major department stores and carpet showrooms are machine-made using either the tubular or flat braid method.[1]

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Borujerd Rug

Borujerd Rug

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Borujerd rugs (Persian: قالی بروجرد qaliye borujerd) is a type of Persian rug woven in Borujerd, Western Iran. Borujerd rugs are different from Luri rugs as well as rugs of Arak and Central Iran. However, they have more features similar with rugs of Hamadan province.

Borujerd rugs are often produced in small (one to two square meters) using local wool and natural colors. Families in the city of Borujerd and its surrounding villages are involved in producing hand-made rugs and carpets.

After establishment of the British-Switzerland company Ziegler & Co. in Sultanabad (Arak) in 1883, this company showed interest in Borujerd rugs because of close distance as well as the quality and durability of Borujerdi rugs. The company also had a large-scale trade with Borujerd for supplying quality natural wool and colors from Borujerd.

Borujerd rug is mostly woven in Oshtorinan in north and in Silakhor[disambiguation needed] in south of Borujerd.[1]

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Bessarabian Rugs and Carpets

Bessarabian Rugs and Carpets

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An antique Bessarabian rug

Bessarabian rugs and carpets are the commonly given name for rugs in pile and tapestry technique originating in Russian provinces as well as Ukraine and Moldova during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.1 Some scholars will classify flat-woven carpets as Bessarabian, while referring to knotted-pile carpets as Ukrainian.2 They are predominantly from an area corresponding to modern Bulgaria and Romania.3 Produced under late Ottoman rule, they stand right on the cusp of European and Oriental carpet weaving (see Turkish carpet).

While most Persian carpets can be classified to a specific region corresponding to their weave, this is not the case with Bessarabian carpets and rugs. With these rugs, the weave only gives clues about the market it was created for (rural or urban); therefore, a normal classification is disregarded and the broader term, “Bessarabian”, is applied.5

All works of the Bessarabian category are highly decorative. Not dissimilar to particular Karabaghs from the Caucasus, many of the designs crafted in Bessarabian carpets are floral in motif. The designs usually fit within a black or brown tone background, executed in a naturalistic western. Some pieces, in particular the flat-weaves, are woven with the distinctive Bessarabian palette in the tradition of kilim rugs from nearby Anatolia.6\

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Bakshaish

Bakshaish

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Bakshaish rugs and carpets are a type of tapestry found in North-West of IranBakshaishHeris County is a town on the banks of the Aji Chay in the Heris region of Northwest Iran. Situated in the mountainous region 60 miles east of the large city of Tabriz, Bakshaish is the oldest rug weaving village in the district of Heris, noted for carpets with diverse abstract adaptations of age-old tribal and classical Persian motifs.7

Carpets and Rugs

Antique Bakshaish “Tree of Life” Rug 8ft 10in x 12ft 3in Circa 1875

Bakshaish rugs adapt the style and sensibility of the most valued smaller tribal carpets from Northern Iran. Bakshaish rugs are considered among the finest examples of larger rugs from the region. Taking their inspiration from Persian classical carpets, the abstract patterns of Bakshaish rugs and carpets feature bold, geometric designs. Most popularly Bakshaish rugs utilize curvilinear medallion designs, transforming classical cartoons into more abstract and energetic drawings similar to Caucasian tribal rugs. In the late 19th century the designs produced in Bakshaish carpets were akin to those of the Arakweavers. Often, following form of village pieces, Bakshaish carpets apply scattered graphics filling the woven field. Alternatively, they use empty space to allow graphics to stand out.

Antique circa 1875 Northwest Persian Bakshaish Camelhair Rug 10ft 0in x 14ft 0in
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Ahar Rug

Ahar Rug

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The Ahar carpet is a type of Persian carpet made in the town of Ahar in Ahar County near Mount Sabalan in Iran.[1]

History

Over the last 30 years Ahar carpets have emerged as a recognizable group in the marketplace, and are sold in many parts of Iran outside its town of origin.

Characteristics

It is a distinctive carpet in the Heriz group of carpets. However the Ahar rug has a more linear design than the Heriz types. The rug is designed so the knot counts are higher but no higher than many carpets that have the geometric design [2]

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