Kateh

Kateh

Kateh is a type of Iranianrice from Caspian region, which, unlike Polo/Cholo, is sticky and does not have Tahdig (the rice, bread or potato crust at the bottom, a traditional delicacy in Iran), though it does form a crust on the bottom where the salt and oil collect. Generally, Kateh needs half the cooking time of Polo-style rice and has a denser flavor due to the addition of butter or oil in the cooking process.

Kateh is considered generally the most simple Iranian rice the ease and speed of cooking makes it popular for casual dinners. It is also the traditional dish of Gilan and Mazandaran.

 

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Pilaf

Pilaf

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pilaf
Polu.jpg

Uyghurpolu
Alternative names Pela, Pilav, pallao, pilau, pulao, pulaav, palaw, palavu, plov, palov, polov, polo, polu, kurysh, fulao, fulab, fulav
Course Main
Region or state Indian subcontinentCentral AsiaMiddle EastEast AfricaCaribbean
Serving temperature Hot
Main ingredients Ricespicesmeat or fishvegetablesdried fruits
Cookbook: PilafMedia: Pilaf

Pilaf or pilau is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth.[1] In some cases, the rice may attain its brown or golden color by first being sauteed lightly in oil before the addition of broth. Cooked onion, garlic cloves, sliced carrot, other vegetables, as well as a mix of spices, may be added. Depending on the local cuisine, it may also contain meatfishvegetablespasta, or dried fruit.

Believed to have originated in ancient India and spread from there to ancient Iran,[2] pilaf and similar dishes are common to BalkanMiddle EasternEastern EuropeSouth CaucasianCentral and South AsianEast AfricanLatin American, and Caribbean cuisines. It is a staple food and a popular dish in AfghanistanArmeniaAzerbaijanBangladeshIsrael,[3]CreteIndiaAfghanIranKazakhstanRussiaKurdistanKyrgyzstanNepalPakistanKenyaTanzaniaZanzibarUgandaTajikstan,[4]Turkey,[5]Xinjiang, and Uzbekistan.[6][7]

 

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Abyaneh

Abyaneh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Abyaneh
ابيانه
village
Traditional architecture of the village

Traditional architecture of the village
Abyaneh is located in Iran

Abyaneh
Abyaneh
Coordinates: 33°35′07″N 51°35′32″ECoordinates33°35′07″N 51°35′32″E
Country  Iran
Province Isfahan
County Natanz
Bakhsh Central
Rural District Barzrud
Population (2006)
 • Total 305
Time zone IRST (UTC+3:30)
 • Summer (DST) IRDT (UTC+4:30)

Abyaneh (Persianابيانه‎, also Romanized as ĀbyānehĀbiāneh, and Abyāneh)[1] is a village in Barzrud Rural District, in the Central District of Natanz CountyIsfahan ProvinceIran. At the 2006 census, its population was 305, in 160 families.[2] [3]Characterized by a peculiar reddish hue, the village is one of the oldest in Iran, attracting numerous native and foreign tourists year-round, especially during traditional feasts and ceremonies.

An Abyanaki woman typically wears a white long scarf (covering the shoulders and upper trunk) which has a colourful pattern and an under-knee skirt. Abyunaki people have persistently maintained this traditional costume.

On top of the village sits the ruins of a Sasanid era fort.

The dialect of the people of Abyaneh has preserved some characteristics of the Middle Persian language, the language of the Sassanian Persia.

Since June 2005, the village has been undergoing archaeological excavations for the first time ever, as a result of an agreement between Abyaneh Research Center and the Archaeology Research Center of the Iranian Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization (ICHTO).[4]

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Semnan Province

Semnan Province

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Semnan Province
استان سمنان
Province
The entrance of Bayazid Shrine

The entrance of Bayazid Shrine
Semnan counties
Semnan counties
Location of Semnan Province in Iran
Location of Semnan Province in Iran
Coordinates: 35.5769°N 53.3953°ECoordinates35.5769°N 53.3953°E
Country  Iran
Region Region 1[1]
Capital Semnan
Counties 8
Government
 • Governor Seyed Shahaboddin Chavoshi
Area
 • Total 97,491 km2 (37,641 sq mi)
Population (2011)[2]
 • Total 631,218
 • Density 6.5/km2 (17/sq mi)
Time zone IRST (UTC+03:30)
 • Summer (DST) IRST (UTC+04:30)
Main language(s) Semnani languagesPersian

Semnan Province (Persianاستان سمنان‎, Ostān-e Semnān ) is one of the 31 provinces of Iran. It is in the north of the country, and its center is Semnan. The province of Semnan covers an area of 96,816 square kilometers and stretches along the Alborz mountain range and borders to Dasht-e Kavir desert in its southern parts.

The province was put as part of Region 1 upon the division of the provinces into 5 regions solely for coordination and development purposes on June 22, 2014.[1]

Counties of the province include Semnan CountyAradan CountyDamghan CountyShahrud CountyMehdishahr CountyMeyami CountySorkheh CountyGarmsar County. In 1996, the province had a population of about 501,000 (631,218 in 2011 [2]), and in 2005 Semnan city (the capital of the province) had a population of 119,778, and the city of Shahrud, which accounts for being the largest city of this province, had a population of 231,831. [1]

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reza Abedini

Reza Abedini

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Reza Abedini

Reza Abedini, (Persianرضا عابدینی‎, born 1967 in Tehran) is an Iranian graphic designer and a professor. His works keep a modern theme as he blends traditional Islamic patterns, calligraphy and culture. He combines simple illustrations with poetic typography and elegant layouts, exploring the beauty of the Persian language.[1] He is also an art critic, independent art director with Reza Abedini Studio and the editor-in-chief of Manzar magazine in Iran.[2]

Early life

He graduated in 1985 from the School of Fine Arts in Tehran, majoring in graphic design.[2] He went on to get a second degree and majored in painting from the Tehran University of Art and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1992. Upon graduating until 1993 he was the Editor of the visual section of Sureh Monthly Magazine. In 1993, he founded Reza Abedini Studio an independent design consultancy and art direction studio.[2]

Design

His design influences include Aleksander RodchenkoIkko TanakaSani’ol Molk GhafariRoman Cieslewicz and Mirza Gholam-Reza Esfahani.[3]

Abedini has won dozens of national and international design awards. In 2006, he received the Principal Prince Claus Award in recognition of his personal creativity in the production of special graphic designs, as well as for the personal manner in which he applies and redefines the knowledge and accomplishments of Iran’s artistic heritage, thus making them highly interesting. The award also focuses attention on the diversity of both the historical and the modern Iranian culture, recognizing the impact of graphic design as an influential international means of communication.

Abedini is a member of the Iranian Graphic Designers Society since 1997,[2] he was a member of jury at several biennials throughout the world. His name is listed in Meggs History of Graphic Design, as one of the world’s outstanding post digital graphic designers.[4]

Academic career

Since 1996, he has been a Professor at the University of Tehran in graphic design and visual culture.[5] He previously was a visiting Assistant Professor of graphic design and visual culture at the American University of Beirut.[citation needed]

Honors and awards

  • 1993, 1994, 1996 – First Prize: best film poster of Fajr International Film Festival Iran
  • 1994 – Film Critics Special Award for the Best film poster, Iran
  • 1996 – IRIB’S Special Award: The Best film poster, Iran
  • 1999 – 3rd Award: poster, The 6th Biennial of Iranian Graphic Designers, Tehran
  • 1999 – Special Award: Creativity from Iranian Graphic Designers Society, Tehran
  • 2003 – Special Prize: China International Poster Biennale China
  • 2004 – The Union of Visual Artists of the Czech Republic Award, Brno, Czech
  • 2004 – Second prize: 15th Festival d’affiches de Chaumont France
  • 2004 – Gold Prize: Hong Kong International Poster Triennial Hong Kong
  • 2004 – First prize and gold medal: 8th International Biennial of the Poster in Mexico
  • 2004 – Silver prize: Second International Poster Biennale Korea
  • 2004 – First prize: The First international Biennale of the Islamic world Poster, Iran
  • 2005 – Bronze Medal: The 2nd China International Poster Biennial CIPB, China
  • 2005 – First prize: 9th Press Festival of Children & Young Adults, Iran
  • 2006 – Principal award, Prince Claus Award, Netherlands[6][5]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ramin Djawadi

Ramin Djawadi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ramin Djawadi
Ramin Djawadi.jpg

Ramin Djawadi in 2008
Background information
Born July 19, 1974 (age 43)
Duisburg, West Germany
(now Germany)
Origin Iranian/German
Genres Soundtrack
Occupation(s)
Instruments Pianokeyboardsynthesizerguitar
Years active 1998–present
Labels
Website www.ramindjawadi.com

Ramin Djawadi (/rɒˈmn ˈɑːvədi/,[1] Persianرامین جوادی‎; born July 19, 1974) is an Iranian-German composer. Djawadi is best known for his Grammy-nominated score for the 2008 Marvel film Iron Man and his score for HBO’s acclaimed television series Game of Thrones. He is also known for his works on movies such as Clash of the TitansPacific RimWarcraftA Wrinkle in Time and television series including Prison BreakPerson of Interest and Westworld.

Early life

Djawadi was born in Duisburg, West Germany, to an Iranian father and a German mother, and studied at Berklee College of Music.[2][3]

Career

After graduating summa cum laude from Berklee College of Music in 1998,[4] Djawadi garnered the attention of Hans Zimmer, who recruited him to Remote Control Productions.[5] Djawadi moved to Los Angeles and worked as an assistant to Klaus Badelt. From there on he made additional music and arrangements for Badelt and Zimmer movies, such as Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl and the Academy Award nominated film, Something’s Gotta Give. In 1999, he had co-composed the music for System Shock 2, the second installment in the series. In 2003, he did the score of Beat the Drum along with Badelt.[6]

In 2004, Djawadi went out on his own with Blade: Trinity, collaborating with The RZA for director David S. Goyer. This was the beginning of his relationship with Goyer for both film and television. The following year he continued making additional music for Zimmer in movies such as Batman Begins and The Island, which was his last time working in the background of another composer. The same year, he also composed the Emmy-nominated main title theme and score for Prison Break and the same for the related show Breakout Kings.[7]

In 2006, Djawadi scored the first Sony Animation project, Open Season, followed by the sequel Open Season 2 (2008). Djawadi’s ethereal score for the film Mr. Brooks in 2007 earned him a World Soundtrack Award for Discovery of the Year nomination. His other scores include Deception, starring Hugh Jackman and Ewan McGregorRobert Towne‘s Ask the Dust, and Iron Man, which was a commercial success with global revenues of $585.2 million.[8] Djawadi’s work in these computer-animated films attracted the filmmakers of the Belgium-based nWave, who created one of the first animated movies in 3D, Fly Me to the Moon.

In 2009, Djawadi wrote the score for Goyer’s horror thriller The Unborn, which was produced by Michael Bay. Further collaboration with Goyer was on the television show FlashForward the same year, earning him his second Emmy nomination.In 2010, Djawadi completed Warner Brothers’ Clash of the Titans. The same year, he also scored the soundtrack for the video game Medal of Honor. In 2011 he was selected to score HBO’s fantasy drama Game of Thrones.[9] His continued work on Game of Thrones has garnered him several industry awards and recognition .[10] In 2011, he worked on the CBS crime drama Person of Interest.[11] In 2013, Djawadi composed for the science fiction film Pacific Rim. He also scores the FX’s vampire drama The Strain, created by Pacific Rim director Guillermo del Toro.[12]

In 2016 Djawadi composed for the fantasy film Warcraft and the HBO science fiction show Westworld.[13][14] The same year, Djawadi composed the score for the fantasy action monster film The Great Wall.[15]

Personal life

Djawadi is married to Jennifer Hawks, a music executive in the film industry.[16] According to Djawadi, he has the sensory condition known as synesthesia whereby he may “associate colors with music, or music with colors”, and it allows him to visualize music.[17]

Works and awards

Djawadi has composed and produced over one hundred soundtracks and film scores for both film and TV. His best known work is the score of HBO‘s series, Game of Thrones, along with other television shows such as Prison BreakPerson of Interest and Westworld. He is also known for film scores such as Pacific RimIron Man, and Warcraf
t

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Qom Province

Qom Province

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Qom Province
استان قم
Province
Location of Qom Province
Coordinates: 34.6456°N 50.8798°ECoordinates34.6456°N 50.8798°E
Country  Iran
Region Region 1 [1]
Capital Qom
Counties 1
Area
 • Total 11,526 km2 (4,450 sq mi)
Population (2011)[2]
 • Total 1,151,672
 • Density 100/km2 (260/sq mi)
Time zone IRST (UTC+03:30)
 • Summer (DST) IRST (UTC+04:30)
Main language(s) Persian

Qom Province (Persianاستان قم‎, Ostān-e Qom), pre-Islamic Komishan/Qomishan, is one of the 31 provinces of Iran with 11,237 km², covering 0.89% of the total area in Iran. It is in the north of the country, and its provincial capital is the city of Qom. It was formed from part of Tehran Province in 1995. In 2011, this province had a population of 1,151,672 out of which 95.2% resided in urban areas and 4.8% in rural vicinities.[2] The province contains the cities of QomJafariyehDastjerdKahakQanavat & Salafchegan. There is only one county in the province by the name of Qom County.

The province was put as part of Region 1 upon the division of the provinces into 5 regions solely for coordination and development purposes on June 22, 2014.[3]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jahan Shah

Jahan Shah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jahan shah
padishah-i Iran (in Persian)[1]
Reign 1438–1467
Predecessor Ispend bin Yusuf
Successor Hasan Ali ibn Jahan Shah
Born 1397
Died 1467

Muzaffar al-Din Jahan Shah ibn Yusuf (1397 in Khoy – 1467 in Tabriz) (Persianجهان شاه‎; AzerbaijaniCahan Şah/جهان شاه) was the leader of the Kara Koyunlu oghuz Turks dynasty in Azerbaijan and Arran who reigned c. 1438 – 1467. During his reign he managed to expand the Kara Koyunlu’s territory to its largest extent, including Eastern Anatolia, most of present-day Iraq, central Iran, and even eventually Kerman. He also subjugated neighbouring states. He was one of the greatest rulers of the Kara Koyunlu. He was also allegedly fond of drinking and entertainment. During his reign Jahan Shah had the Gökmedrese and Muzafferiye theological schools constructed in his capital city Tabriz.

Jahan Shah comes to power[edit]

Around 1420 Jahan Shah married the daughter of Alexios IV of Trebizond and Theodora Kantakouzene, part of the agreement being that Alexius would continue paying to the Kara Koyunlu the tribute that Trebizond had formerly paid to Timur. During the reign of his brother Qara Iskander (1420–36), as a potential rival to the throne, Jahan Shah’s life was not safe and he took refuge with his other brother Ispend who was ruling Baghdad. In 1436 he obtained the help of the Timurid ruler Shah Rukh to defeat Qara Iskander and seize the throne for himself. Having been helped to power by Shah Rukh he ruled at first as a vassal of the Timurids.

In the year 1462, Abd al-Razzaq described Jahan-shah’s rule in the following terms: “Owing to the benevolent administration (husn-i ‘inayat va lutf-i atifat) of Mirza Jahan-shah, Azarbayjan was a highly thriving state. That well-meaning sovereign was anxious to practice justice, to secure prosperity of the country, and to treat his subjects honourably. The capital, Tabriz, by its numerous population and the prevalence of tranquility, emulated Egypt (misr-i jami). The rumours of the good behaviour of that felicitous king spread throughout the world. The inhabitants of his God-protected kingdom, indifferent to the arrows of events, enjoyed peace”.[2]

 

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jahan_Shah

Shirvanshah

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirvanshah

Shirvanshah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mazyadi/Kasrani/Darbandi
Shirvan gerb.png

Coat of arms of the Shirvanshahs[1]
Country  Azerbaijan
 Dagestan
Ethnicity Arabs, Persians
Founded 861
Founder Yazid b. Mazyad al-Shaybani
Final ruler Abu Bakr Mirza
Titles Shah of Shirvan
Shah of Layzan
Emir of Derbent
Dissolution 1538
Cadet branches Shervashidze
House of Black Monk

Shirvanshah (Persianشروانشاه‎, AzerbaijaniŞirvanşah), also spelled as Shīrwān Shāh or Sharwān Shāh, was the title of the rulers of Shirvan, located in modern Azerbaijan, from the mid-9th century to the early 16th century. The title remained in a single family, the Yazidids, an originally Arab but gradually Persianized dynasty, although the later Shirvanshahs are also known as the Kasranids or Kaqanids.[2][3] The Shirvanshah established a native state in Shirvan (located in modern Azerbaijan Republic).

Origin and history

The battle between Shah Farrukh Yassar of Shirvan and Shah Ismail of Persia

The title ‘Shirvanshah’ appears to date back to the period before Islam‘s emergence in the Arabian peninsulaIbn Khordadbeh mentions the Shirvanshah as one of the local rulers who received their title from the first Sassanid emperor, Ardashir I.[2][3] Al-Baladhuri also mentions that a Shirvanshah, together with the neighbouring Layzanshah, were encountered by the Arabs during their conquest of Persia, and submitted to the Arab commander Salman ibn Rab’ia al-Bahili.[2][3]

From the late 8th century, Shirvan was under the rule of the members of the Arab family of Yazid ibn Mazyad al-Shaybani (d. 801), who was named governor of the region by the Abbasid caliph Harun al-Rashid.[3][5] His descendants, the Yazidids, would rule Shirvan as independent princes until the 14th century.[3] By origin, the Yazidids were Arabs of the Shayban tribe and belonged to high ranking generals and governors of the Abbasid army.[5] In the chaos that engulfed the Abbasid Caliphate after the death of the Caliph al-Mutawakkil in 861, the great-grandson of Yazid b. Mazyad Shaybani, Haytham ibn Khalid, declared himself independent and assumed the ancient title of Shirvanshah. The dynasty continuously ruled the area of Shirvan either as an independent state or a vassal state until the Safavid times.[2]

One of the important books in the early history of this dynasty is the anonymous Taʾrikh Bab al-Abwab (“History of Darband“), preserved by the Ottoman historian Münejjim Bashi (Chief Astronomer), the last date of which concerning the dynasty is 468/1075. A translation of this important work into English language was published by the orientalist Vladimir Minorsky in 1958.[5][6] We know from this book that the history of the Shirvan Shahs was closely tied with that of the Arab Hashimid family in Darband (Bab al-Abwab) and intermarriage between the two Arab families was common with Yazidids often ruling for various periods in the latter town.

 

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirvanshah

Kara Koyunlu

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara_Koyunlu

Kara Koyunlular
Black Sheep Turkomans
قره قویونلو
1374–1468
Kara Koyunlu of the Turkomans, lighter blue shows their greatest extent in Iraq and Arabian East Coast for a small period of time
Capital Tabriz
Languages
Religion Islam
Government Monarchy
Ruler
 • 1375–1378 Bayram Xoca
 • 1467–1468 Hasan ‘Ali
Historical era Middle Ages
 • Established 1374
 • Disestablished 1468

Preceded by

Succeeded by
Jalayirids
Ag Qoyunlu
Today part of
WarningValue not specified for “common_name

The Kara Koyunlu or Qara Qoyunlu, also called the Black Sheep Turkomans (Persianقره قویونلو‎), were a Muslim Oghuz Turkicmonarchy that ruled over the territory comprising present-day AzerbaijanArmenia (1406), northwestern Iran, eastern Turkey, and northeastern Iraq from about 1374 to 1468.

History

The Kara Koyunlu Turkomans at one point established their capital in Herat in eastern Iran.[4] They were vassals of the Jalairid Sultanate in Baghdad and Tabriz from about 1375, when the leader of their leading tribe ruled over Mosul. However, they rebelled against the Jalairids, and secured their independence from the dynasty with the conquest of Tabriz by Qara Yusuf. In 1400, Timurdefeated the Kara Koyunlu, and Qara Yusuf fled to Egypt, seeking refuge with the Mamluk Sultanate. He gathered an army and by 1406 had taken back Tabriz.

In 1410, the Kara Koyunlu captured Baghdad. The installation of a subsidiary Kara Koyunlu line there hastened the downfall of the Jalairids they had once served. Despite internal fighting among Qara Yusuf’s descendants after his death in 1420, and the increasing threat of the Armenian separatists and Ajam, Kara Koyunlu later broke up due to series of different Armenian revolts.

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara_Koyunlu